Research Log 1

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Research Log 1

My personal shuttle is packed with mission supplies and I have an early departure to the planet I’ve been invited to study. Planet 29. I wonder what I will find on this arid, scarcely populated, planet.

The entirety of Planet 29 is a desert only capable of sustaining the most highly adapted life forms. It has been discovered that at one time, not long ago in the galactic record, the planet was a fertile host to all manner of life. The climate shifted dramatically after a massive asteroid impact. A mass extinction took place and when the climate settled it was hot and dry.

I have arrived at the compound where my living quarters and lab are located. I learned the construction of the facilities began thirty years ago. It was developed by a pair of researchers that decided there work was ongoing. They rarely go off planet. I’ve noticed their steps are far lighter than most their age and broad smiles come easily to their faces. Their research became woven into their life and they seem to have enjoyed it thoroughly. So much so that they continue it after all these years. They have the deepest love for one another and for Planet 29. Their commitment to this place has led to an optimized research facility and the accommodations they have prepared are most welcome at the end of a day of space travel.

A late afternoon walk led me to an abandoned structure where I met a young and ambitious researcher. He has familiarized me with his project and warned me of some of the local raiders who have not taken kindly to newcomers infringing on the territory they have laid claim to.

The night sky here is tremendous. I was able to locate the solar system of my previous home and planet of departure with unassisted eyes.

Due to the vast distance between Planet 29 and the nearest planet with a hyperspace relay I estimate that these entries will take 5 to 7 days to reach you depending on how many ships are in route between the systems.

–RMJ signing off